Technology

How to re-enable the Apple-provided Java SE 6 web plug-in and Web Start functionality.

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If, after installing Java for OS X 2013-002 and the latest version of Java 7 from Oracle, you want to disable Java 7 and re-enable the Apple-provided Java SE 6 web plug-in and Web Start functionality, follow these steps.

Note: You must be logged in as an administrator. If prompted for your administrator password after a command, enter it and then press the Return or Enter key.

  1. Open Terminal, located in the Utilities folder.
  2. Enter this command, then press the Return or Enter key:
    sudo mkdir -p /Library/Internet\ Plug-Ins/disabled
  3. Enter this command, then press the Return or Enter key:
    sudo mv /Library/Internet\ Plug-Ins/JavaAppletPlugin.plugin /Library/Internet\ Plug-Ins/disabled
  4. Enter this command, then press the Return or Enter key:
    sudo ln -sf /System/Library/Java/Support/Deploy.bundle/Contents/Resources/JavaPlugin2_NPAPI.plugin /Library/Internet\ Plug-Ins/JavaAppletPlugin.plugin
  5. To re-enable Java SE 6 Web Start, enter this command, then press the Return or Enter key:
    sudo ln -sf /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/Commands/javaws /usr/bin/javaws

Installing MacBook Pro trackpad drivers for Windows 8

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It will help to plug in an external USB mouse until you get the drivers installed.

1.  Navigate to device manager (Right click on Windows 8 Start Screen and choose All Apps)

2.  You will see two devices (they might be called TrackPad) with yellow symbols next to them under Human Interface Devices

3.  Right click one of them and click properties

4.  Go to Driver section and click update driver

5.  Click browse my computer for driver software

6.  Click Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer

7.  Choose USB input device.  It will install.

8.  Do the same for the other device

9.  Go back to update driver (for two devices) and choose search automatically for updated driver software.  This changes USB input device to the correct hardware and enables multi-touch.

10.  Do the same for the other device

You shouldn’t have to restart but it never hurts.  Your trackpad should work fine.

 

 

Create a superscope to solve the problem of dwindling IP addresses

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The growth of the amount of wireless devices on our network has accelerated. Everyone–especially the students–has every reason to celebrate. But the IT Dept isn’t in the same celebratory mood. The reason? We’re running on empty (or, more precisely: the DHCP server is).

The problem is that the DHCP server is fast running out of IP addresses to dish out to all the new devices being added to serve our students and faculty. There’s an exclamation mark hanging like an ill omen over the DHCP server icon, an indication that we’re dangerously close to the end of the available address pool.

Thankfully, there’s a simple solution–using a superscope. What’s a superscope? A kind of mother of all scopes. It allows you to add more than one scope (called child scopes, or member scopes) under one umbrella.

Let’s go ahead and create a superscope for our scenario. We’ll assume DHCP is set up to use the scope 192.168.0.0. We want to add another scope from the same class (Class C), so let’s use 192.168.1.0. But first we need to create a superscope. Here’s how:

  1. Open DHCP.
  2. Right-click on the DHCP server.
  3. From the drop-down list, choose New Superscope to launch the New Superscope Wizard.
  4. The wizard prompts you to enter a name for the superscope. We’ll just call it Wireless.
  5. On the next screen, you’ll be asked to select a scope(s) to add to the superscope. You’ll see the list of available scopes–in our example we’ll just use the original IP range of 192.168.0.0. Select it and click Next.

The final screen of the wizard informs you that you have successfully completed the New Superscope wizard and gives you the details. If you go back into DHCP, you’ll see that the new superscope has been created.

Now we’re ready to create our brand new child scope that will be watched over by our superscope.

  1. Open DHCP.
  2. Right-click on the DHCP server.
  3. Select New scope (to launch the New scope wizard.
  4. Choose a name and description for the new scope. Call it whatever you want.
  5. The wizard will prompt you to add an IP address range. We’ll choose a range from the Class C range 192.168.1.0. (We could also have chosen 192.168.2.0, 192.168.3.0, etc., but we’ll stick to … 1.0, as it follows logically on our first range). As for start and end address, we’ll select all available addresses, starting with 192.168.1.1 and ending with 192.168.1.254. You will also have to use the arrow keys to update your netmask (most likely to 255.255.255.0).
  6. On the next screen, you can choose which range of addresses you want to exclude, if any.
  7. Now, you get to select the duration of IP address leases. The default is eight days.
  8. The wizard then gives you the opportunity to configure DHCP options. You can choose to do it now or wait until later. Note, however, that you have to configure the most common options (like DNS server address and default gateway) before clients can use the scope, so now is as good a time as ever to do it. Just use the same options as your existing scope.
  9. After configuring the DHCP options, you are asked whether you want to activate the scope now or later. Once activated, you’re almost done.

You now have what is termed a multinet–multiple subnets on a single physical network. But you’re not quite there yet. Yes, you have an additional scope; yes, you have a superscope. But your superscope won’t assign IP addresses from the new scope. And even if you add a static address from the pool to a client machine, you’ll notice that you can’t browse the network.

You still need to add the IP to your main router. Here’s how to add that:

The commands to add an IP address to an interface look something like this (depending on the interface and address):

int e 0/0

ip address 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0

But you’re adding a second address to the same interface, so you have to add the keywordsecondary to the command. So to add the address range from our new child scope, the command would be:

int e 0/0

ip address 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 secondary

That’s it!   When your first series of IPs run out the devices should grab a hold of the second range.

Auto-logging off Windows 7 after xxx minutes.

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Once we decided to get away from network logins and move to a generic Student account we were faced with the problem of students forgetting to log off.  This was remedied with the WINEXIT screensaver that comes with the Windows 2003 Resource Kit that can be downloaded here.  Once you have downloaded the package follow the following instructions to install the screensaver.  It involves some registry changes as the screensaver needs access to shutdown applications in a non-admin setting so don’t do this unless you are comfortable changing registry settings.

1.  Log in as an administrator
2.  Download Rktools.exe from the link supplied above.
3.  Install it and Restart
4.  Log in as an administrator
5.  Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe)
6.  Open the following key:  HKEY_Local_Machine\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\IniFileMapping\Control.ini
7.  Click Permissions
8.  In the Name box, click and add Everyone, and then click on the ADVANCED box for special permissions
9.  Click Edit and select the Set Value and Create Subkey check boxes
10.  Click OK, and then click OK
11.  Quit Registry Editor and restart the computer
12.  Log in to the Student account
13.  Copy the WinExit.scr file from Program Files -> Windows Server Resource Kit
14.  Paste WinExit.scr to  C:\Windows\System32
15.  The Logoff Screensaver should now be an option in your Windows Screensavers
16.  Adjust Settings to choose how long the computer should wait before logging off.

NOTE:  In order to change the message that appears you need to hit enter after changing the message.  Do this before you click on OK or Apply.

itunes

Splitting iTunes library over multiple hard drives

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With the price of storage so low I have the luxury of owning a custom PC that I put together myself.  8GB of RAM, 5 Terabytes of storage and yes, it also washes my dishes.

I’m slightly anal when ti comes to separating my media so I wanted a way I could put my movies on one hard drive, my music on another and my television shows on a third.   My main operating system and program files reside on a separate hard drive as well.   The dilemma being I am slightly wedded to iTunes as a management tool since most of my television shows were bought through the iTunes store.

iTunes not so conveniently stores all of your files under one folder (in sub-folders, of course).

But there is a solution!

1.  Find all of your existing iTunes movies and TV shows and move them to your new drive using Finder (or just drag and drop them in Windows). The movies are normally located at/Users/[Your_Username]/Music/iTunes/iTunes Music/Movies and the TV shows are at/Users/[Your_Username]/Music/iTunes/iTunes Music/TV Shows.

Newer versions use a iTunes Media folder.

2.  Once these two folders and their contents have been copied to your new drive, launch the iTunes software.

3.  Using the left sidebar, go to the Movies heading. Select all of the items there, right-click, and choose Delete from the menu. First you’ll be asked for confirmation that you want to remove the movies from your library (you do), and then you’ll be asked whether you want to keep the file itself or move it to the trash. Select Move to Trash.

4.  Repeat step 3, this time using the TV Shows heading instead of Movies. You’ve already copied the files to another hard drive so don’t worry about losing them.

5.  Now it’s time to re-add the video files back into your library. Open your new drive and locate the Movies and TV Shows folders you copied at the beginning.

6.  While holding down the Option (Shift on Windows) key, drag the Movies and TV Shows folders from the Finder window to iTunes. Everything should go right back to the way it was with one exception — the video files are now stored on a different disk volume rather than on your Mac. The Option key keeps them there by overriding the iTunes setting which automatically copies files back to the internal disk.

7.  Any time you want to add a new movie or TV show to your library, move it over to the appropriate folder on your new hard drive, hold Option, and drag it to iTunes.

appletv_roku

Roku versus Apple TV

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content soon

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